Posts for: May, 2013

By Arnold Cutler, D.D.S.
May 30, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: bad breath  
FindingtheRootCauseofBadBreathistheKeytoSuccessfulTreatment

Halitosis (bad breath) is a major personal and social concern — so much so that Americans spend nearly $3 billion annually on rinses, mints and gum to freshen breath. While helpful in alleviating occasional bad breath caused by oral dryness (brought on by stress, eating certain foods, prescription medications, smoking or consuming alcohol), those with chronic halitosis require a much different treatment approach.

That's because there are a number of possible causes for chronic halitosis, among them: xerostomia (chronic dry mouth), caused by mouth breathing; periodontal (gum) disease; or candidiasis, a yeast infection caused by some antibiotics. It may also arise as a secondary symptom of systemic diseases like liver disease, diabetes or cancer.

The most common cause, though, is bacteria. Many types of oral bacteria can produce terrible odors, most notably volatile sulphur compounds (VSCs) with their “rotten egg” smell. Because of its relative dryness and difficulty in cleaning, the back of the tongue is a wonderful environment for bacteria to multiply and thrive.

If you suffer from chronic halitosis, our primary objective then is to try to uncover its specific cause, which will determine what course of treatment we would recommend. First, what is your experience with halitosis — have others noticed it or just you? Next, we would consider your medical history — have you had any health issues with your ears, nose or throat, or experienced any gastrointestinal disorders or lung problems? What kind of medications do you take, and are your kidneys and liver functioning properly? We would also perform a thorough dental exam for any signs of tooth decay, gum disease or a dry, coated tongue as well as look at your diet and lifestyle choices, like smoking or alcohol use.

Having a better idea of what may be causing your bad breath, we can then tailor a treatment plan that might involve, among other things, treatment for tooth decay, a periodontal cleaning (scaling), instruction on better oral hygiene and tongue cleaning with a scraper or brush, or the removal of third molars where debris may be accumulating in the gum flaps.

Finding the cause of bad breath can take time, but is well worth the effort. The end result is a treatment plan that works.

If you would like more information on understanding and treating chronic halitosis, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More than just embarrassing.”


ClearOrthodonticAlignersAreTheyRightForYou

If you are considering having your teeth straightened, for cosmetic or other reasons, the idea of using clear aligners rather than traditional braces may be appealing.

Here are the answers to some frequently asked questions about clear aligners.

What are clear aligners?
Clear aligners are clear removable custom fitted “trays” that gradually straighten teeth. Used sequentially, each individual tray is slightly different from the one before and is worn every day for two weeks before going on to the next one in the series. This slowly moves your teeth to a new position.

How are they made?
The trays are computer-generated, based on impressions and models of your mouth combined with the knowledge of growth, development of teeth and jaws, and most importantly how and why teeth move.

How long does this treatment take?
By wearing clear aligners for at least 20 hours per day for two weeks before changing to the next tray in the sequence, treatment time can range from six months to two years depending on your individual situation.

Can children wear clear aligners?
Clear aligners are generally used for adults who have all their teeth and when jaw growth is complete, but can be used for younger people depending upon the extent and severity of their situation.

What situations can clear aligners be used for?
Clear aligners can realign or straighten teeth, close mild spaces, treat elongated teeth and tip teeth into better position. They are usually recommended for correcting mild to moderate crowding of teeth, particularly if your back teeth already fit together properly.

When are clear aligners probably not the right choice?
If you have a bad bite (your back teeth do not fit together well), or if you have a severe overbite or underbite, traditional braces are probably a better choice for treatment. If your teeth are severely crowded, or if your situation is complex, clear aligners will probably not be the right treatment choice.

How do you decide whether clear aligners are right for you?
An orthodontic assessment of your individual situation must be performed by our office.

What is considered in the assessment?
The assessment includes specialized x-rays of your teeth, jaws and skull, along with photos, impressions, and models of your bite.

For more information about clear aligners vs. traditional braces, make an appointment with us for a consultation and an examination of your own situation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Clear Orthodontic Aligners: An Alternative for Adult Orthodontics.”




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